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Posted by on May 18, 2012 in Blog, Education | 6 comments

What’s your most vivid learning memory? Share your brilliance!

What’s your most vivid learning memory? Share your brilliance!

We’re thinking about how Minimalist Parenting can help you navigate the exciting (and often tricky) waters of your child’s education. So much about school — choosing the “right” school for you child, and then helping him thrive there — causes parents to shift into a new level of worry. Is he happy? Is he learning enough? Does he get along with his teacher? Is he making friends?

We’d like to take the focus off of school for a moment and think more broadly about learning. Starting with your learning memories.

What are your most vivid learning memories? Can you recall a time or an experience in which you learned a skill or attitude you’ve used for the rest of your life? You may have learned it in school or out, during childhood or adulthood — doesn’t matter. We just want to know when and how you picked up that bit of wisdom that has served you most.

We’re keeping an eye out for original stories and anecdotes to share in our book (there will be lots of space devoted to school and the social scene). Please be sure to include your email address if you’d like to be considered. We won’t add it to a mailing list — we’ll only contact you to ask permission to include your story.

Thank you! Can’t wait to hear your stories.

Photo credit: Flickr/David Schott

 

6 Comments

  1. Just for kicks I asked my 8 y.o. son (in second grade). He said, “Definitely the life cycle of insects because we raised caterpillars into butterflies and they were right there in our classroom and it was really exciting!”

    Now granted, this happened really recently, so it’s fresh in his mind. My husband and I are mulling it over. I think the “bit of wisdom that has served you most” is a high bar! Oh, the pressure….

    • If you’re feeling pressure, let me rephrase! We’re not expecting earth-shattering wisdom here, just those moments in which you learned something you’ve ended up using throughout your life. For example, in college, my dad suggested I start an IRA. I was in my early 20s at the time and I thought “Retirement? Is he kidding?” But then I learned all about the magic of compound interest and that kicked off an interested in personal finance and investing. It was one conversation that had big implications for my life.

  2. I had a brilliant teacher for high school Anatomy and Physiology — Donna Mae Huberman — who gave pop quizzes called “Four Sixes”. She would bring six students to the front of the class, then ask them questions from that week’s lesson. If four of the six students gave correct answers, then everyone in the class received points. Yes, I learned my A&P, but I learned something more important: we are each responsible for the success of the group. Every person has something they can contribute which benefits the class, the school, and society as a whole.

    As a college professor of psychology, I give “Four Sixes”, but teaching prosocial behavior is a core lesson.

    • That’s totally brilliant.

  3. One learning memory that has stayed with me all my life is my mother’s mantra: “there is always something you can learn from everyone you meet. What are you going to learn, what behavior are you going to adopt, from this teacher / friend / enemy / acquaintance?”

    One learning memory that I wish I had learned as a child in a family where academic success was always the top priority, but am only learning now as an adult, is that “People may not remember exactly what you did or what you said, but they will remember how you made them feel.”

    • Wow, Jarasa. That actually chokes me up a bit. Thank you for sharing.

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  1. School & Social Matters: Share Your Brilliance | Minimalist Parenting - [...] you are digging the school topic and haven’t yet had a chance to share your brilliance re: your most …

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